Category Archives: Game Design

Chess 3030

As a brief refresher, the entire purpose of Chess 60 was to reduce the benefit of opening preparation to effectively zero. Top level players, and frankly even >2000 ELO players (fairly highly rated) have played so many games and remembered … Continue reading

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Chess 60, an incorrect name

It occurred to me that I had improperly counted the amount of possible starting combinations of the so-called “Chess 60”. I had overlooked that there are two knights, and so many of the positions will simply be repeats of another, … Continue reading

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Chess 60 – Graphical Display

This is a follow up from my previous post, please read that first. Thank you. Since a command line program isn’t particularly interesting I decided to turn that small program that generates a board into a program that also displays … Continue reading

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Tying it all together – what makes games good

This post can be thought of as the collection of all the conclusions from my previous posts. In other words, it’s not so much what makes games good, as it is advise for how to make good games. My goal … Continue reading

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Game Worlds

PLACE Do you want to be in this world? Why is it that sometimes when we play a game, we immediately love being in that world? This is a question I’ve tried to answer, and partially have answered, but I … Continue reading

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Miscellaneous

Kind of a cheat category. Lack of bugs, menus functional and consistent with the tone of the game, low or non-existent loading times, small footprint on the hard-drive. These things all improve the quality of a game, but I found … Continue reading

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Freedom in games

FREEDOM The less the game harasses the player, the better. This is entirely in a non-mechanical or challenge sense. –non-game-mechanic choices     —-exploration –––It’s one thing to actually have a world I want to play in, it’s another to let … Continue reading

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